Columbus, Ohio
We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

 

Birds love our exclusive seed cylinders and no-melt suet cylinders. Unfortunately, so do many nimble, furry backyard inhabitants.

Well, no more! We've added some heat to our bird food cylinders. While birds such as chickadees, titmice and nuthatches readily eat foods containing hot pepper, pesky critters will shy away from them.

For best results, use a cylinder feeder with a roof to prevent the hot pepper from being washed off or diluted by the weather. 

Out With the Old

Just as people make seasonal wardrobe changes, many birds are beginning a transformation of their own, losing and replacing their feathers in a process known as molting.

Molting is when a bird replaces some (partial molt) or all (full molt) of its feathers.

This complicated process requires a lot of energy and may take up to eight weeks to complete. Molting is so physically demanding for most ducks and geese that they can’t fly and will molt in seclusion to avoid predators.

Molting season varies by species and time of year. Right now many birds are beginning their main molt of the year, however, American Goldfinches (pictured above) are one of the last to molt. Due to their late nesting period, they won’t start their molt until late August.

Distinguishing birds that are molting from those that are not can be difficult. Though some birds may lose patches of feathers and appear “balding,” most birds’ feather loss and replacement are far less noticeable.

Feathers are made of more than 90% protein, primarily keratins, so every molting bird needs extra proteins to grow strong feathers for proper flight and effective insulation.

For the next few months, offer high-protein bird foods, such as Nyjer® (thistle), peanuts, Jim’s Birdacious® Bark Butter® and mealworms, to ensure that your birds have a reliable source of protein to help them with molting.

Visit us soon for all of the high-protein foods that will meet your birds’ needs.

We have everything you need to help your birds keep going (and re-growing feathers) during this critical time.

Making the Most of Late Summer

Though this month marks the beginning of the end of summer, there are still plenty of opportunities to help birds and maximize your backyard enjoyment.

Ruby-throated HummingbirdHummingbird Migration

Millions of hummingbirds are preparing to fly back to their winter ranges. Hummingbirds have been migrating between North and Central America for hundreds of years, some traveling thousands of miles each way.

A high-calorie diet is important to build fat reserves for their trip, so be sure to have your hummingbird feeders ready.

Studies show that most of the hummingbirds visiting your feeders on a day toward the end of migration season are replaced by a new wave of migrants within 24 hours.

Offering Water

Whether they are feeder visitors or not, birds need water for drinking, bathing and preening. Offering a dependable source of water is the simplest and most important step you can take to increase the variety of birds in your yard.

Birds must be ready to fly at all times, especially during migration. Bathing is a critical part of keeping their feathers in top-flight condition.

Deter Unwanted Visitors

Mosquitoes lay their eggs in still water, so open sources of water can cause a potential mosquito problem. Use a fountain, waterfall accessory or Water Wiggler™ to create ripples and prevent mosquitoes from laying eggs in your bird baths. Water in motion is also more attractive to birds.

Visit us soon. We have everything you and your birds need to make the most of late summer.